Arkansas geodetic surveys are showing no new earthquakes, geoscientist says

Posted October 06, 2018 05:08:46 geoscience researchers at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock have found that geodetics surveys of Arkansas have not recorded any new earthquakes since the start of the year.

Researchers surveyed areas in northern Arkansas between the Little Rock-Franklin Mountains and the Rio Grande Valley, which include parts of Little Rock, Little Rock City, and surrounding areas.

The area includes some of the poorest and most densely populated areas of the state, and its proximity to the Rio Grand River has drawn a large number of people to the area for the past few years.

The researchers also discovered that, even though some of these areas were more active during the spring, there were no new seismic activity.

The findings, which are published in the journal Geoscience, were published in advance of a public presentation on the research at a geosciences conference on October 9.

A team of geoskeptics at the Arkansas Geological Survey and the University at Little Robeson did the survey.

The research was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The study is the second study of geodestination of the Arkansas region since the beginning of the calendar year, following a geodos survey conducted by the Geological Survey of Canada in 2016.

The previous study was conducted by geoscanner David Oakes in January 2018.

Both projects involved measuring geodetectors and geodewaters in an area and then measuring their properties to determine the geodicatures of the areas’ ground motions.

The 2016 study was published in Geology, and the 2017 study was presented at the International Geophysical Year meeting in Mexico City.

The 2017 study found that the region around the Rio Guevara River, where most of the seismic activity in Arkansas is occurring, had recorded no new seismicity.

However, the 2016 study found a large area in the Rio River basin had experienced an increase in seismicity in 2016, which could be explained by increased groundwater levels.

The geodescanner David P. Johnson, who led the 2016 geodiscanner’s study, has now found that while there has been no seismic activity since the end of 2017, that is no reason to believe the seismicity has been reduced.

The new geodecommission report found that in 2016 there were 951 recorded seismic events in the Arkansas River Basin, compared to 644 recorded events in 2017.

The seismicity rate has been steady since the 2016 survey.

“The seismicity rates we’ve seen in the area of activity are comparable to those observed in the region of the Rio Guadalupe, where the last large earthquake in the basin was recorded,” Johnson said in a statement.

“There have been a few minor earthquakes in the surrounding areas, but the rate of seismicity is similar to what we saw in the upper part of the basin.”

Johnson added that the geoscheme used to measure the seismic activity in the areas was not accurate enough to capture the seismical activity.

“We’ve found that there are a number of faults in the river basin that could have triggered the seismors in the 2016 seismic events, which is consistent with our previous study of the seismogenic potential of the river,” Johnson wrote.

The results of the 2017 survey showed that in the same area as the 2016 surveys, there was also an increase of seismic activity during the summer of 2017.

“In addition to the observed increase in seismic activity, we also found that this increase was accompanied by significant decreases in ground water levels, indicating that the increase in ground level in the spring of 2017 was associated with a significant reduction in water levels in the lower part of our river basin,” Johnson concluded.

“Overall, the increase of seismic activities in the winter of 2017 in the Upper Rio Grande River Basin is consistent to the extent that there is a decrease in ground surface water levels at the same time as an increase that is associated with an increase.”

Johnson also found no evidence of groundwater injection.

“Our study shows that in areas where geodismission activity has occurred, the earthquakes have been localized in small areas, and have occurred at low frequency,” Johnson added.

“Therefore, while we have not detected new earthquakes in any of the previously studied areas, we do not know why.

We believe that these changes are a natural byproduct of the groundwater injection that has taken place in these areas over the past year.”

The geosatographer also noted that, because the 2016 and 2017 surveys were conducted within the same geologic context, it is possible that the 2016 earthquake had a different cause.

“Given the uncertainty about the cause of the 2016 earthquakes, it does not appear likely that the cause was an earthquake of the same magnitude that occurred in 2016,” he said.

Johnson added the findings of the geoscape also indicate that geologists are seeing no new geosign

GOP presidential candidates say the science of climate change is settled

President Donald Trump on Tuesday called climate change a “phony” and “phony question” and argued that the scientific consensus on human-caused global warming is settled.

The remarks come amid a heated debate over the extent to which the federal government should be involved in the fight against climate change and the role of the private sector in the effort.

Trump and his Republican rivals have said the science is settled on climate change, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has already taken steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but the president has made no indication he plans to seek a broader role in regulating greenhouse gas pollution.

On Tuesday, Trump told a gathering of the Kansas Geological Survey that the “science is settled” on climate changes.

“The science is really settled on the fact that we are causing global warming, and we’ve had this for a long time,” Trump said.

“You see it every day.”

The president was speaking at a campaign rally for Kansas gubernatorial candidate Jason Pappas.

At least one Democratic presidential candidate, former Maryland Gov.

Martin O’Malley, has said he is open to a role in tackling the issue.

But Trump on Wednesday repeated his assertion that the science on climate is settled and said he believes climate change isn’t real.

“I’ve always believed in the science, I’ve always said the scientists are right,” Trump told reporters on Air Force One.

“But the real science is we’ve got a problem.

We’ve got to fix it.”

O’Malley’s spokeswoman, Andrea Miller, said Trump believes the science.

“While the president’s comments are certainly concerning, they do not represent his position on the science,” Miller said in a statement.

The Republican nominee also used the event to push back against the scientific community, saying he disagrees with a recent study that found global temperatures have warmed by 0.5 degrees Celsius in the past 100 years.

“I think the media has gone to extremes with their headlines, but we don’t need to go to extremes,” Trump insisted.

“You look at the number of degrees Fahrenheit, it’s the same amount of warming that’s happened in the last 50 years.”

Trump said he wants to cut emissions and is open for negotiations to reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas output.

“If we can make them work, we will.

We’re going to get this done,” Trump added.

On Monday, he said he didn’t agree with the U